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DateLecture
20 February 2020IMAGES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE
19 March 2020THE ECCENTRICITY EFFECT Does knowledge of the artist's life affect how we perceive their work?
21 May 2020WINIFRED NICHOLSON Things left in the air
18 June 2020FIRST CATCH A SQUIRREL Historical materials and techniques of painting 15th to 17th centuries
17 September 2020LANDSCAPE AND ENVIRONMENT FROM FACTORY TO FRACKING How artists respond to the impact of industry on the environment
15 October 2020THE BARBER INSTITUTE - IMAGES OF BLACK PEOPLE
19 November 2020JOSEPH OF NAZARETH Representations of the legends and faces of Joseph through the ages.
21 January 2021THE QUEEN OF INSTRUMENTS The lute in Old Master paintings
18 February 2021GAUGIN, VAN GOGH AND EMILE BERNARD The Terrible Trio
18 March 2021AUGUSTUS AND GWEN JOHN The lives and work of two contrasting siblings

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IMAGES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE Dr John Stevens Thursday 20 February 2020

Dr John Stevens is a Research Associate at SOAS, University of London, and a member of academic staff at the SOAS South Asia Institute.  His PhD in History is from University College London. He teaches British Imperial history, Indian history and Bengali language, and is a regular visitor to India and Bangladesh. He publishes widely in the fields of British and Indian history. His biography of the Indian guru Keshab Chandra Sen – Keshab: Bengal’s Forgotten Prophet - was published by Hurst, OUP New York and OUP India in 2018. He appears regularly in the Indian media and was recently a guest on BBC Radio Four’s In Our Time, discussing the poet and artist Rabindranath Tagore.

At the turn of the twentieth century, the British Empire held sway over approximately one quarter of the total population of the world. British imperial power was projected through a variety of artistic mediums, from fine portraiture and grand imperial buildings to more popular forms of imagery. British artists also produced countless images of people from all over the globe who had become subjects of British rule. Through considering a variety of paintings, buildings and objects from across the Empire, this lecture provides a fascinating insight into the ways in which the British viewed themselves and their subjects in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.